Trial of man accused in NH church shooting delayed again

The trial of a man accused of shooting two people inside a church in Pelham in 2019 has again been delayed. was due to stand trial in June, but that date was pushed back to October when he was appointed as the new lawyer. During court proceedings on Friday, defense attorneys said they were concerned about their doctors’ access to Holloway in jail, saying they would not have an opinion on his mental state in time to the trial. “My concern is that it’s going to be difficult to get our doctors out there and have our doctors do that assessment,” defense attorney John MacLachlan said. “These assessments are equivalent. They must be made.” But in pushing to keep the October date, prosecutors argued the proceedings had gone on too long. “In a month, it will be three years since this happened,” Hillsborough County Assistant District Attorney Brian Greklek-McKeon said. “Victims have rights under the Victims Bill of Rights. They are entitled to a speedy resolution, just like the accused.” The two sides agreed to mediation in December. The judge said that since mental health is a crucial part of the trial, it can be pushed back to April 2023. He warned that he would not be inclined to continue allowing further motions. A new trial date has not yet been set.

The trial of a man accused of shooting two people inside a church in Pelham in 2019 has again been delayed.

Dale Holloway, from Manchester, is facing multiple charges, including attempted murder, in connection with the murder of two people at a church in Pelham.

Holloway was due to stand trial in June, but that date was pushed back to October when he was appointed as the new attorney. During court proceedings on Friday, defense attorneys said they were concerned about their doctors’ access to Holloway in jail, saying they would not have an opinion on his mental state in time to the trial.

“My concern is that it’s going to be difficult to get our doctors out there and have our doctors do that assessment,” defense attorney John MacLachlan said. “These assessments are equivalent. They must be made.”

But in pushing to keep the October date, prosecutors argued the proceedings had gone on too long.

“In a month, it will be three years since this happened,” Hillsborough County Assistant District Attorney Brian Greklek-McKeon said. “Victims have rights under the Victims Bill of Rights. They are entitled to a speedy resolution, just like the accused.”

The two sides agreed to mediation in December. The judge said that since mental health is a crucial part of the trial, it can be pushed back to April 2023. He warned that he would not be inclined to continue allowing further motions.

A new trial date has not yet been set.

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