Project Rebound at Sacramento State gives formerly incarcerated people a second chance at life

More than 122,000 people are incarcerated in California state prisons, according to the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan research organization. Of these 122,000 people, the distribution of incarcerated people is also disproportionate. Data from The Sentencing Project, a research and advocacy center, shows that black people are six times more likely to be incarcerated than white people. But once incarcerated people are released, their sentencing follows them, affecting many areas of their lives. This is where the California State University System’s Project Rebound seeks to help change their lives for the better. The program was expanded to Sacramento State in 2016 and currently has 72 formerly incarcerated students. Aaron Greene is one of those affected by the program. He started his journey in 2015. “When I got out of prison and went to college, it was not an easy thing. I didn’t have people who looked like me there. I was an older student – non-traditional,” the current director of Sac State’s Project Rebound said. also dealing with the ripple effects left by their time in prison. Formerly incarcerated face barriers to employment, discrimination and housing. In fact, the nonprofit Prison Policy Initiative reports that formerly incarcerated people are about 10 times more likely to be homeless than the general public. “You don’t have credit, you don’t have a rental history, you have a conviction history, so you’re automatically locked into housing in certain areas,” Greene said. CSU Fullerton has become the first to provide housing to students who are part of the program. The housing process will now be extended to Sac State, potentially helping some incarcerated students who are currently part of Project Rebound at Folsom and Mule Creek State Prisons. Sac State will make an offer on a property this week to start and be able to offer the house to students when they leave prison. CSU Fresno is another institution looking to lease a few properties to provide affordable housing for students in their program. California Juvenile Incarceration About two years ago, Jarad Nava was given a second chance to live outside of prison. At 17, he was sentenced to 162 years in prison. The juvenile detention rate is 30 per 100,000 in the state of California. . This gave him the opportunity to apply for parole a few months later. Today, he is part of the Rebound project and at the same time works in the State Senate. “I’m very grateful to be here because I wasn’t supposed to. I think it kind of shows that there are a lot of people who are still incarcerated, who have changed their lives and who, if given their given the opportunity, can be very successful here,” Nava said. Sac State holds a negligible recidivism rate of zero percent, compared to the latest average of 44.6 percent updated by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

More than 122,000 people are incarcerated in California state prisons, according to the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan research organization.

Of these 122,000 people, the distribution of incarcerated people is also disproportionate. Data from The Sentencing Project, a research and advocacy center, shows that black people are six times more likely to be incarcerated than white people.

But once incarcerated people are released, their sentencing follows them, impacting many areas of their lives.

It’s there that California State University’s Rebound Project seeks to help change their lives for the better. The program was expanded to Sacramento State in 2016 and currently has 72 formerly incarcerated students.

Aaron Greene is among those affected by the program. He started his journey in 2015.

“When I got out of prison and went to college, it wasn’t an easy thing. I didn’t have people who looked like me there. I was an older student – non-traditional “, said the current director of Rebond of the Sac State project.

He said for students who have spent years or decades behind bars, life can be daunting once they get out of prison and, as they work for a better future, they also face the effects training left over from their time in prison. .

Formerly incarcerated face barriers to employment, discrimination and housing. In fact, the nonprofit Prison Policy Initiative reports that formerly incarcerated people are about 10 times more likely to be homeless than the general public.

“You don’t have credit, you don’t have a rental history, you have a conviction history, so you’re automatically locked into housing in certain areas,” Greene said.

CSU Fullerton became the first to provide housing for students who are part of the program. The housing process will now be extended to Sac State, potentially helping some incarcerated students who are currently part of Project Rebound at Folsom and Mule Creek State Prisons. Sac State will make an offer on a property this week to start and be able to offer the house to students when they leave prison.

CSU Fresno is another institution looking to lease a few properties to provide affordable housing for students in their program.

California Juvenile Incarceration

About two years ago, Jarad Nava was given a second chance to live outside prison. At 17, he was sentenced to 162 years to life in prison.

The the custody rate for minors is 30 per 100,000 in the state of California.

Nava said he never plans to return home until his sentence is commuted to 10 years to life. This gave him the opportunity to apply for parole a few months later.

Today, he is part of Project Rebound and concurrently works in the State Senate.

“I’m very grateful to be here because I wasn’t supposed to. I think it kind of shows that there are a lot of people who are still incarcerated, who have turned their lives around and who, if given the opportunity, can be very successful here,” Nava said.

Sac State holds a negligible recidivism rate of zero percent, compared to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s last updated average of 44.6 percent.

The United States is the world leader in incarceration with more than 2 million people in jail and jail, according to The Sentencing Project.

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