Ex-UCI student faces prosecution over mass shooting threats | new university

A former UCI student was sentenced to three years and eight months in prison before an early release after seven months in October 2021. Among the offenses were mass shooting threats posted to Twitter: “In 2020, I had planned to carry out a mass shooting on the campus of UC Irvine. My intention was to cause financial harm to the University…I had planned to prosecute the murder of students at the if the University does not provide compensation for my injuries.

Sebastian Bogdan Dumbrava, 30, pleaded not guilty seven counts –– including one count sending an email with the intent to extort an employee of the University of California president’s office and an attorney representing the board of trustees demanding immediate payment of $50,000 $ for transportation and lodging — and is being held on $1-million bail. The Orange County District Attorney’s Office has informed the UCI that the trial is scheduled for August 2.

Dumbrava was placed in psychiatric detention in January 2020. The UCI Police Service (UCIPD) initially suspected Dumbrava of intending to self-harm after the discovery of Reddit Posts in which he wrote his dorm address and “come kill me…and get 5K”.

The affidavit of UCIPD detective Samuel Soon describes threatening emails and messages written by Dummbrava, such as a Tweeter quoting Virginia Tech shooter Seung-Hui Cho in 2007: “You pushed me into a corner and only gave me one option. The decision was yours. Now you have blood on your hands that will never go away.

Dumbrava for follow-up the University of California board of trustees the following August on the grounds that the restraint was unlawful and prevented him from acquiring a security clearance necessary for his pursuit of a career in the federal government. He demanded a settlement of $600,000 a year for 30 years on Dec. 27 — the same day he bought $675 worth of assault rifle parts.

The police report said Dumbrava purchased high-capacity magazines and ammunition in Arizona — where background checks to purchase ammunition are not required, although transiting them to California is prohibited.

Officers found 1,199 rounds of ammunition, 22 high-capacity magazines and a deconstructed AR-15-style firearm at Dumbrava’s home in January 2020. He was convicted in March 2021 of unlawful possession of a firearm. fire and ammunition.

Dumbrava was sentenced to three years and eight months in prison. He served seven months of his sentence and was released in October 2021. His justifications for his crimes were as follows on Twitter: “In 2020, I had planned to carry out a mass shooting on the campus of UC Irvine. My intention was to cause financial harm to the University…I had planned to prosecute the murder of students at the if the University does not provide compensation for my injuries.

Dumbrava was stopped again in January 2022 after he allegedly drained his ankle monitor’s battery and refused to attend a mandatory visit with a probation officer.

A second search warrant led law enforcement to find receipts for the purchase of ammunition and five high-capacity magazines, purchased in Arizona, in her mother’s storage locker in Anaheim, according to Soon’s statement.

Dumbrava was released in February but stopped again in early March by Garden Grove police following his failure to report to a probation officer.

“This is someone who has repeatedly threatened to shoot a college campus and has the guns and ammunition to do it and I’m mad as hell that the state legislature refuses to give me the tools to put him behind bars where he belongs for a very long time. When someone shows us who they are and what they are capable of, we have to believe them –– and do something about it,” said Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer said in a statement. Press release.

The UCIPD sent school-wide emails to students on April 19, May 31st and July 18 with updates on the case and assurance of vigilance from UCIPD and campus leaders.

“Threats of gun violence should be handled with a high sense of urgency and caution, especially given the frequency with which they occur nationwide,” said second-year student Apurva Mandal. computer science and engineering. “Although I was alarmed by the content of the emails and the idea that my peers and I were in danger, I appreciate the priority given by the UCI to our safety and their ability to keep us well. informed.”

UCIPD encourages community members to report suspicious activity to 949-824-5223.

Veronica Garza is editor-in-chief of City News 2022-2023. She can be reached at [email protected].

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