China Developing AI “Prosecutor” Who Can File Complaints “With 97% Accuracy”


[ad_1]

China Developing AI ‘Prosecutor’ Capable of Identifying ‘Dissent’ and Complaining ‘With 97% Accuracy’

  • The system can file complaints for the eight most common crimes in Shanghai
  • It runs on a standard computer and can participate in the decision-making process
  • But we fear that the machine will be militarized by the state










China has developed an artificial intelligence prosecutor that can indict people for crimes with more than 97% accuracy, the researchers say.

The dystopian machine can identify “dissent” against the state and suggest sentences for suspected criminals, thereby excluding people from the prosecution process.

There are already fears that the system is being militarized by the Chinese Communist Party with human prosecutors concerned about who would take responsibility for AI decisions.

China has developed an artificial intelligence prosecutor who can indict people for crimes with over 97% accuracy, researchers say

The tool can file a complaint based on a verbal description of the case and was designed and tested by the Shanghai Pudong People’s Procuratorate, the largest and most active district attorney’s office in China.

AI would allow human prosecutors to lighten their caseloads and focus only on the most complex cases, project lead scientist Professor Shi Yong said.

The system can run on a standard desktop computer and would make a complaint based on 1000 ‘features’ of the human-generated case description text, the South China Morning Post reported.

He was “trained” using 17,000 actual cases from 2015 to 2020 and is able to identify and press charges for the eight most common crimes in Shanghai.

These include “causing trouble” – a term used to stifle dissent in China, credit card fraud, gambling offenses, dangerous driving, theft, fraud, intentional injury and obstructing official functions.

Soon the AI ​​prosecutor will be able to recognize more types of crimes and lay multiple charges against a suspect once they are upgraded.

Shi said in an article published in the Journal of Management Review: “The system can replace prosecutors in the decision-making process to some extent.”

Some AI technologies already exist in law enforcement, but this would be the first time they’ve been involved in lawsuits.

In Germany, image recognition and digital forensics are used to help with workloads, while China uses a tool known as System 206 to assess evidence, a suspect’s potential danger, and conditions of arrest.

The Chinese government is increasingly relying on AI to increase productivity, with machines already in place to fight corruption and increase state control

The Chinese government is increasingly relying on AI to increase productivity, with machines already in place to fight corruption and increase state control

But the system has no role in the decision-making process and does not come up with sentences.

A Guanghzhou prosecutor said he was concerned about the new technology.

He said: “The accuracy of 97% may be high from a technological point of view, but there will always be a risk of error.

“Who will take responsibility when this happens? The prosecutor, the machine or the designer of the algorithm?

He added that many human prosecutors won’t want computers to interfere with their work.

“AI can help spot a mistake, but it cannot replace humans in decision making,” the prosecutor said.

There are also fears that it will fail to keep up with changing social norms and be militarized by the state.

The Chinese government is increasingly relying on AI to increase productivity, with machines already in place to fight corruption and increase state control.

[ad_2]

Comments are closed.