Corrections And Rehabilitation – Criminal Justice Online http://criminaljustice-online.com/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:58:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://criminaljustice-online.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Corrections And Rehabilitation – Criminal Justice Online http://criminaljustice-online.com/ 32 32 Governor Ducey releases budget focused on education, border security and water https://criminaljustice-online.com/governor-ducey-releases-budget-focused-on-education-border-security-and-water/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 21:58:00 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/governor-ducey-releases-budget-focused-on-education-border-security-and-water/ PHOENIX — Governor Doug Ducey released his budget for fiscal year 2023 today, continuing the momentum that has made Arizona a success in education, public safety, natural resources and infrastructure. “Whether it’s paying off billions in debt, growing our Rainy Day Fund to a record $1 billion, getting a high credit score and lowering taxes […]]]>

PHOENIXGovernor Doug Ducey released his budget for fiscal year 2023 today, continuing the momentum that has made Arizona a success in education, public safety, natural resources and infrastructure.

“Whether it’s paying off billions in debt, growing our Rainy Day Fund to a record $1 billion, getting a high credit score and lowering taxes for hard-working Arizonans, we make decisions fiscally responsible people who benefit the people we serve: the citizens of Arizona,” Governor Ducey said. “Our FY2023 Executive Budget continues this management. We are going full throttle to leave Arizona stronger than we found it through targeted investments in education, public safety, border security , infrastructure and things that matter to Arizonans.

Strengthening Arizona’s Strong Financial Position
For the past seven years, Arizona has lived within its means. Under Governor Ducey, Arizona enjoyed the longest period of balanced budgets in modern state history. While its population has grown, the budget is balanced, the economy is booming, and the government is smaller and more efficient than it has ever been. This year, the Executive Budget will continue to secure Arizona’s fiscal future by raising the Rainy Day Fund to the highest level in state history.

Since 2016, Governor Ducey has generated $7 billion in ongoing new revenue and put more than $2 billion back into the pockets of Arizonans. In fiscal year 2023, the governor intends to continue allowing Arizonans to keep more of their hard-earned money through the creation of a state-earned income tax credit. , returning an average of $128 per year to hard-working taxpayers.

Investing in the things that matter most to Arizonans
The Governor’s Budget addresses the issues that matter most to Arizonans. Through historic investments, the Executive Budget promotes school choice and focuses on student outcomes, improves public safety and soldier compensation, resolves the border crisis, increases our water resistance, expands a vital part of I-10, keeps families together through family care, catalyzes the modernization of the state park system, and helps Arizona families keep more of their hard-earned money.

Catching up with Arizona’s kids and increasing parent responsibility
The proposed budget invests an additional $322 million in K-12 education to get children back on track as they recover from the effects of the pandemic and remote learning. To further mitigate learning loss, $100 million in federal resources will be allocated to a summer camp, helping to close the achievement gap.

Protecting Arizona’s Southern Border and Arizona Communities
Through targeted investments, the budget continues Governor Ducey’s priority of securing Arizona’s southern border. To create the American Governors’ Border Strike Force, a coordinated, multi-faceted effort, the budget allocates $11.6 million. Matched with $50 million for the Border Security Fund, Arizona will have enhanced border patrols, physical barriers, detention, and pursuits.

Securing new water resources
Building on a monumental water policy, the Executive Budget further invests $1 billion in Arizona’s water future. Through the Drought Mitigation Revolving Fund, rural water supply projects, increased groundwater capacity, and conservation projects, Arizona is creating a sustainable future.

The governor’s office briefed Republican and Democratic lawmakers on budget details this week.

Highlights of the budget plan include:

K-12 and Higher Education

  • $100 million federal resources to launch summer camps and eliminate learning loss

  • $10 million abolish tuition fees in higher education for spouses of veterans

  • $30 million in federal resources for community college workforce accelerators in partnership with industry leaders

  • $5 million build on civic excellence by incentivizing civic achievement

  • $58 million bring renewed attention to closing the achievement gap in chronically underperforming schools

  • $20 million for a second year of school transportation modernization grants to improve best practices for getting students to the school of their choice

  • $60.8 million additional funding to modernize results-based funding, bringing total funding to $129.4 million annually for successful schools

  • $200 million to maintain school facilities through building renovation grants

  • $89.5 million to complete five new schools already under construction and begin construction of three new schools

  • $127 million in additional investments in higher education

  • $46 million support higher education workforce initiatives to prepare students for high-demand jobs

  • $12.5 million to expand the Arizona Promise program

health and wellbeing

  • $19.8 million to support increasing the monthly kinship allowance from $75 to $300

  • $1.5 billion in federal and state resources critical to the state’s COVID-19 response

  • $11.7 million provide optimal care to Arizonans in need through Arizona State Hospital to address ongoing operational pressures

  • $25.7 million to foster a public-private partnership with Creighton University to expand the Accelerated Nursing Academy

  • $8.2 million to protect Arizona’s most vulnerable and reduce the number of cases from Adult Protective Service investigators

public safety

  • $50 million deposit in the Border Security Fund for enhanced patrols, physical barriers, detention and prosecution

  • $11.6 million to expand the Border Strike Force by doubling support from the Department of Public Safety and tripling local law enforcement grants

  • $30.8 million to increase the salaries of law enforcement professionals from the Ministry of Public Security

  • $92.9 million to support the infrastructure needs of the Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Rehabilitation statewide, which will improve the safety of staff and inmates

  • $5 million expand the Governor’s “Second Chance” initiative which provides employment opportunities for inmates after their incarceration, which enhances their ability to become productive citizens

  • $10.4 million to address the Department of Emergency and Military Affairs (DEMA) Readiness Center maintenance backlog

Natural resources

  • $1 billion over three years for strategic water augmentation projects and resources to secure Arizona’s water future

  • $36.2 million to protect Arizona lands through Phase II of the Arizona Healthy Forest Initiative, bringing the state’s total investment for forest treatments to $42.4 million in fiscal year 2023

  • $16.8 million increase the revolving fund for fire suppression to $20 million annually, allowing the state to quickly reimburse local fire departments that help respond to wildfires

  • $176.6 million in federal and state resources to boost rural tourism through 44 state park system projects, which include upgrading campgrounds, renovating historic structures, improving physical and digital access to the park system, and Moreover

government that works

  • $400 million to bring the state’s total commitment to the Interstate 10 expansion to $540 million, which will cover 20 miles of the 25-mile segment and replace the Gila River Bridge. This investment will further position the state to receive federal funds to fully fund the aforementioned 25-mile segment between Phoenix and Casa Grande.

  • $10 million to launch a statewide cybersecurity readiness grant program and provide cybersecurity tools to local governments and school districts

  • $247 million to bolster Arizona State’s shrinking workforce and address inflationary pressures and staffing needs

  • $50 million deposit in the newly created State Match Advantage for Rural Transportation (SMART) fund to help communities outside of Maricopa and Pima counties and the Arizona Department of Transportation compete for federal transportation grants and obtain funds to improve the state’s transportation system.

  • $24.6 million preventing cyberattacks with a new cybersecurity risk management program

  • $15.7 million to develop Business One-Stop Portal Phase II, allowing users to seamlessly plan, start and grow a business in Arizona

Consult the summary book, State Agency Book, and Sources and Uses of State Funds HERE.

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1 Death 117 new cases of Covid in Tuolumne, 54 cases in Calaveras https://criminaljustice-online.com/1-death-117-new-cases-of-covid-in-tuolumne-54-cases-in-calaveras/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 00:28:48 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/1-death-117-new-cases-of-covid-in-tuolumne-54-cases-in-calaveras/ Tuolumne County Public Health Covid-19 Cases by Episode Date Tuolumne County Public Health reports that a man in his 80s has died from Covid-19. There are 117 new Covid-19 positive cases identified since yesterday, 112 are community cases and 5 are Sierra Conservation Center inmate cases. Newly reported community cases include 30 cases aged 17 […]]]>

Tuolumne County Public Health reports that a man in his 80s has died from Covid-19. There are 117 new Covid-19 positive cases identified since yesterday, 112 are community cases and 5 are Sierra Conservation Center inmate cases. Newly reported community cases include 30 cases aged 17 or younger and 16 cases aged 60 or older. Tuolumne County’s active community cases have increased from 85 to 586, including 6 people hospitalized.

Tuolumne public health officials say, “We are aware that test results from the [state Covid testing] site have been delayed due to high usage across the state. Currently we are seeing results take up to 4-5 days.

Tuolumne health officials also say, “While our COVID response team is continuing case investigation and contact tracing efforts, due to the sharp increase in cases we are experiencing, we will only be reaching not everyone with a personal phone call. Vaccination and other COVID-related data can be found on the state’s website. Tuolumne residents who receive a positive test result will likely receive a text or email from a “virtual agent” who will provide them with information on what to do next. Health officials say, “You can help slow the spread of Covid-19 by responding to texts, calls or emails and isolating yourself when you have symptoms or a positive test result. Also tell any close contacts you had for 2 days before you got sick or were tested. All close contacts should follow current quarantine guidelines and get tested 3-5 days after exposure. If you are at high risk of serious illness or hospitalization, you can contact your doctor to discuss potential treatment options. If you are not symptomatic, have not tested positive for COVID-19 recently, and are not in quarantine, get vaccinated or boosted. Updated to the most recent isolation and quarantine guidelines, Tuolumne’s health order is here.

The state reports the 14-day average of patients hospitalized with Covid-19 is 9 down 35.7% from the 14-day average the previous day. The state reports no critical care beds available in Tuolumne County out of six.

New Covid cases by sex and age: six girls and five boys aged 11 or under, nine girls and 10 boys aged 12 to 17, 10 women and seven men aged 18 to 29, 11 women and nine men in 30s, 8 women and 6 men in their 40s, 10 women and 5 men in their 50s, 5 women and 4 men in their 60s, 3 women and 2 men in their 60s and 2 men in their 40s.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) reports 94 cases of currently active inmates. There have been 1,693 inmate cases at the Sierra Conservation Center, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) reports CSC is managing 3,194 inmates with 82% vaccinated, including all Southern Fire Conservation Camps and has tested 52% of the prison population in the last 14 days. There are 73 staff who report having Covid, an increase of 3 out of 1,160. A total of 506 staff report being or having been Covid positive with a 56% vaccination rate reported among staff.

The total current case rate, a 14-day average for Tuolumne County, has risen from 104.9 to 113.7 per 100,000 population. The case rate hit a low of 15.1 on December 17. A total of 24 people were released from solitary confinement, in total 6,835 were released from solitary confinement. The lowest number of active cases since July was 62 on November 29. The county sends samples from residents for sequencing which takes time, so far the Omicron Covid-19 variant has yet to be detected. In total, 59% of the population eligible for vaccination was vaccinated.

Calaveras County Public Health reports 54 new cases since yesterday. There are 22 more active cases for a total of 112 active cases including two Covid hospitalizations. Ten of the new cases are 17 or younger and nine are 65 and older, in total 884 under 17 and 834 over 65 have been identified with Covid. There are 34 others counted as recovered for a total of 4,743 cases and 55.99% of the eligible population is fully vaccinated in the county. According to the state, Calaveras’ 14-day average for Covid hospitalizations remains at two with no increase or decrease and there remain five critical care beds available.

Mariposa Health Officials report that they may not be contacting all cases due to the large number of people testing positive. They are asking those who show symptoms or test positive to stay home to reduce the spread. Mariposa shares that people with COVID-19 have experienced a wide range of symptoms ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms can appear from 2 to 14 days, and with the Omicron variant seem to appear most often from 2 to 4 days. Here’s what they recommend doing if you have symptoms or feel sick:

  • Stay at home. Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home except to seek treatment.
  • Do not visit public places.
  • Take care. Rest and stay hydrated. Take over-the-counter medications, such as acetaminophen, to help you feel better.
  • Stay in contact with your doctor. Call before receiving medical attention. Be sure to get medical attention if you have trouble breathing, or have other emergency warning signs, or think it may be an emergency. Details are on cdc.gov.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning people against fraudulent coronavirus home testing/rapid testing, as noted here.

COVID-19 testing Public Health recommends making an appointment to get tested 5 days after possible exposure and if you have symptoms, get tested immediately. The Tuolumne County State Testing Site hours are 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the Mother Lode Fairgrounds and will be open on the Martin Luther King, Jr. January. Appointments can be made at www.lhi.care/covidtesting or by calling 888-634-1123. Tests are also available at pharmacies, Rapid Care and hospital emergency departments if you have symptoms, or contact your health care provider. More details are here.

Covid-19 vaccine appointments and booster injections are recommended. The CDC recommends that moderately or severely immunocompromised children ages 5 to 11 receive a booster shot of the Covid vaccine 28 days after their second injection. The CDC also now recommends people get a booster shot if they completed a Pfizer series at least five months ago, or the Moderna series at least six months ago, or a J&J vaccine at least two months ago. month. Vaccination appointments for children ages 5-11 can be made through myturn.ca.gov, or by calling 833-422-4255, or through local pharmacies, details are here. To learn how to deal with a fear of needles or phobia and help others, see the CDC’s information guide here. Learn more about self-care strategies by visiting namica.org

county
Dated
New
Active (Hospital)
Total 2022 All cases (all deaths)
love 1/11 66 278 (9) 196 4,170
(62)
Calaveras 1/12 54 112 (2) 314 4,949
(94)
Mariposa 1/12 39 68 (12) 237 2,039
(18)
Mono 1/12 56 195 285 2,260
(5)
Stanislas 1/12 802 7,342 (161) 7,486 92,459
(1,501)
Tuolumne 1/12 117 586 (6) 982 9,266 (152)
Cases declared at the end of 2021 and 2020

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Arizona Corrections offers booster shots to inmates https://criminaljustice-online.com/arizona-corrections-offers-booster-shots-to-inmates/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/arizona-corrections-offers-booster-shots-to-inmates/ PHOENIX – As the omicron variant of COVID-19 spreads across Arizona, state corrections recently announced it will offer booster shots to inmates who have been fully immunized against the virus. The Arizona Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Reintegration in a press release said the boosters were being deployed at all 10 prison complexes across the […]]]>

PHOENIX – As the omicron variant of COVID-19 spreads across Arizona, state corrections recently announced it will offer booster shots to inmates who have been fully immunized against the virus.

The Arizona Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Reintegration in a press release said the boosters were being deployed at all 10 prison complexes across the state in addition to six privately contracted facilities.

Since February 2020, 12,800 inmates have tested positive for the virus, according to the department’s scoreboard, which represents 20.11% of the state’s prison population. There have been 56 confirmed deaths of inmates from COVID-19.

Vaccines against the virus are encouraged but not required for inmates, the department said.

“The COVID-19 booster shots, especially in the midst of the latest variant, will go a long way in helping our exceptional correctional officers and professional staff as we continue our work to mitigate COVID-19 in our collective correctional environment,” said David Shinn, director of ADRCR. said in the press release.

Booster injections are also offered in each state penitentiary establishment to officers and professional staff of the department.

State Corrections said COVID-19 protocols will continue, such as face coverings being mandatory for indoor inmates when they are outside their housing unit.

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Baranyai: We must fight against the “indigenization” of Canadian prisons https://criminaljustice-online.com/baranyai-we-must-fight-against-the-indigenization-of-canadian-prisons/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 05:04:58 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/baranyai-we-must-fight-against-the-indigenization-of-canadian-prisons/ Breadcrumb Links Chroniclers As Ontario braces for a “tsunami” of COVID-19 hospitalizations driven by the highly contagious variant of Omicron, it is difficult to focus on far beyond the immediate fallout from canceled medical procedures, staff crises and another rush to support online learning. Author of the article: Robin baranyai • Special to Postmedia News […]]]>

As Ontario braces for a “tsunami” of COVID-19 hospitalizations driven by the highly contagious variant of Omicron, it is difficult to focus on far beyond the immediate fallout from canceled medical procedures, staff crises and another rush to support online learning.

Content of the article

As Ontario braces for a “tsunami” of COVID-19 hospitalizations driven by the highly contagious variant of Omicron, it is difficult to focus on far beyond the immediate fallout from canceled medical procedures, staff crises and another rush to support online learning.

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Content of the article

With all eyes on the looming disaster, another rising tide is quietly approaching a devastating high tide. Indigenous women now make up almost half of inmates in federal prisons, Canada’s Correctional Investigator, Dr. Ivan Zinger, reported in December.

As with Omicron’s trajectory, we can’t say we didn’t see it coming.

Zinger’s office has been sounding the alarm bells for years. The crisis is not confined to women either. Six years ago, the Federal Prisons Ombudsman said 25 percent of all federal inmates were Indigenous – one in four – when they made up only five percent of the Canadian population.

Four years later, the proportion of indigenous prisoners had exceeded 30 percent, setting a new all-time high. Zinger called the “indigenization” of Canadian prisons a “national parody”. He also called on the Correctional Service of Canada to realign its priorities and resources, “to reduce readmissions and readmissions, better prepare Indigenous offenders to meet early parole eligibility dates and return Indigenous offenders to their home community in a more secure manner ”.

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The Supreme Court recognized that the over-representation of Indigenous people in Canadian prisons was a “crisis” in 1999. The court ruled in the landmark R. v Gladue case, sentencing judges must consider the impacts of colonialism, such as than residential schools and child welfare. system, on Aboriginal offenders.

In its 2015 report, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada detailed several calls to action to address the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in detention, including alternatives to imprisonment. The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls amplified these calls for justice, including more culturally appropriate Indigenous-led rehabilitation programs and the creation of a Deputy Commissioner for Corrections indigenous.

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Meanwhile, the reality has only gotten worse. The decline in incarceration rates for non-Aboriginal people is offset by the increase in the number of Aboriginal inmates. Successive governments and courts have failed to resolve the problem.

One of the problems is the lack of judicial discretion in sentencing. The Harper government had a particular affection for mandatory minimum sentences, which bring consistency to criminal sentences to the detriment of responding to the individual circumstances of each offender.

Mandatory minimum sentences have long been criticized for their disproportionate impact on racialized populations. Many mandatory minimum sentences introduced under Stephen Harper were subsequently found to be unconstitutional.

Justice Minister David Lametti said the policies of the former government “did not deter crime or make our justice system more efficient or fairer.” All the approach has done is jail too many aboriginal, black and marginalized Canadians.

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There are 67 mandatory minimum sentences in the Criminal Code, reports CBC, for crimes ranging from murder and sexual offenses to impaired driving. A law recently introduced by the federal government would reduce 14 minimum sentences for certain firearms and tobacco offenses. Bill C-5 would also eliminate mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses. The bill reflects a Liberal bill introduced last February, which died on the Order Paper when the election was called.

In response to Zinger’s report, Lametti called Bill C-5 “an important step in addressing the disturbing statistics in the Correctional Investigator’s Report.” Some senators are calling for amendments to give sentencing judges more leeway to waive mandatory minimum sentences when they perpetuate systemic racism or cause injustice.

It will take sustained attention and political will to reverse this devastating trend. We saw it coming. We cannot allow this to continue.

write.robin@baranyai.ca

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California Prison Visits Suspended Due to COVID-19 Spike https://criminaljustice-online.com/california-prison-visits-suspended-due-to-covid-19-spike/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/california-prison-visits-suspended-due-to-covid-19-spike/ California prison authorities are suspending in-person and family visits to inmates from Saturday due to the increase in COVID-19 cases among staff and inmates, officials said on Friday. The shutdown is effective for California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation facilities statewide for 15 days. “This temporary measure aims to limit movement between and within establishments […]]]>

California prison authorities are suspending in-person and family visits to inmates from Saturday due to the increase in COVID-19 cases among staff and inmates, officials said on Friday.

The shutdown is effective for California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation facilities statewide for 15 days.

“This temporary measure aims to limit movement between and within establishments (and) is a necessary step to curb transmissions,” said the CDCR. “In-person and family visits will be suspended from Saturday, January 8, until further notice.

“The visits on Friday January 7 will go ahead as planned. All current family visits will be allowed to continue until the family visit is complete. “

The CDCR says it will offer video tours during the suspension.

The agency’s COVID tracking page shows a total of 2,838 new confirmed COVID cases among employees over the past two weeks, with a total of 2,764 active cases. The CDCR indicates that 49 deaths of staff members have occurred since the start of the pandemic.

The CDCR has identified 1,343 new cases among its prison population over the past two weeks, with a total of 246 deaths.

Sam Stanton has worked for The Bee since 1991 and has covered a variety of topics including politics, criminal justice and breaking news.


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CommonWealth Magazine https://criminaljustice-online.com/commonwealth-magazine/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 18:11:45 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/commonwealth-magazine/ AN OFFICIAL VETERAN from the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department said the correctional agency could do better and promised it was ready to lead the way. Sandy Zamor Calixte, who served as head of external affairs and communications under Sheriff Steve Tompkins, announced Wednesday morning that she plans to challenge him in the Democratic primary in […]]]>

AN OFFICIAL VETERAN from the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department said the correctional agency could do better and promised it was ready to lead the way. Sandy Zamor Calixte, who served as head of external affairs and communications under Sheriff Steve Tompkins, announced Wednesday morning that she plans to challenge him in the Democratic primary in September.

“For the past two decades, I’ve done the behind-the-scenes work to make the department more fair, transparent and community-focused,” Zamor Calixte said in his announcement outside the Mildred Avenue Community Center in Mattapan. “But after working the system behind the scenes and advocating behind the scenes, it’s clear to me that the only way to implement the change we need for the community and the employees of the Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department is a new leadership. I am this new leadership.

Zamor Calixte, a 48-year-old Mattapan resident, said she resigned her post yesterday and told Tompkins that she intends to run for office.

“I have immense respect for the current sheriff,” she said in her opening speech. “But it’s not just one person. It’s about changing a system to give people the services they need to get a second chance, because too many people in our community have never had a first chance.

For too long, she said, community residents, especially blacks and Latinos, have been denied “the education, opportunities and resources they deserve” and “because of policies. government, they end up in the correctional system ”. Once there, she said, they are too often denied the opportunities necessary “to successfully reintegrate into our community.” Zamor Calixte said there are programs in the sheriff’s department aimed at reducing recidivism, but she said they needed to be expanded and strengthened.

The daughter of Haitian immigrants, Zamor Calixte started in the sheriff’s department in 2006 as the coordinator of community outreach and youth programs. She holds a BA in Psychology and an MA in Criminal Justice, both from Northeastern University.

Former state representative Marie St. Fleur, who was among a dozen supporters of Zamor Calixte’s announcement, said she brings in-depth knowledge of the pros and cons of the correctional system. “She has a passion for trying to figure out how to do it better and differently. I think that’s what we’re aiming for right now, ”said St. Fleur.

Asked about Zamor Callistus’ challenge, Tompkins said he “didn’t see it coming” but said “this is what democracy is all about.” He said he plans to get re-elected this fall and has bragged about his record in shifting the department from a punitive approach to corrections to one that focuses on rehabilitation.

Meet the author

Editor-in-chief, Commonwealth

On Michael jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in Massachusetts journalism since the early 1980s. Prior to joining the CommonWealth team in early 2001, he was an editor for the magazine for two years. Her cover story in the Fall 1999 issue of CommonWealth on Boston Youth outreach workers was shortlisted for a National Crime and Delinquency Council PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award.

Michael made his journalism debut at Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston’s largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the City Weekly section of the Boston Sunday Globe.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he co-produced “The AIDS Quarterly,” a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s he worked as a producer for “Our Times,” a weekly magazine on WHDH- TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

On Michael jonas

Michael Jonas has worked in Massachusetts journalism since the early 1980s. Prior to joining the CommonWealth team in early 2001, he was an editor for the magazine for two years. Her cover story in the Fall 1999 issue of CommonWealth on Boston Youth outreach workers was shortlisted for a National Crime and Delinquency Council PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award.

Michael made his journalism debut at Dorchester Community News, a community newspaper serving Boston’s largest neighborhood, where he covered a range of urban issues. Since the late 1980s, he has been a regular contributor to the Boston Globe. For 15 years he wrote a weekly column on local politics for the City Weekly section of the Boston Sunday Globe.

Michael has also worked in broadcast journalism. In 1989, he co-produced “The AIDS Quarterly,” a national PBS series produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, and in the early 1990s he worked as a producer for “Our Times,” a weekly magazine on WHDH- TV (Ch. 7) in Boston.

Michael lives in Dorchester with his wife and their two daughters.

Tompkins held the same post in external affairs under former Sheriff Andrea Cabral that Zamor Calixte had under his administration. He was appointed sheriff in 2013 by the then governor. Deval Patrick when he called on Cabral to become his public safety secretary. Tompkins was then elected in 2014 to serve the remainder of Cabral’s term, and was re-elected in 2016 for a full six-year term.

He easily beat two Democratic primary challengers in 2014 and an unregistered general election candidate, and beat a primary challenger in 2016.

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Case Management Assistant Job – Hennepin County https://criminaljustice-online.com/case-management-assistant-job-hennepin-county/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 21:34:19 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/case-management-assistant-job-hennepin-county/ ++OPENING DATE :++ 03/01/22 ++CLOSING DATE:++ 01/10/22 23:59 PM central time ++TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT:++ Full time ++SITE:++ Minneapolis and surrounding suburbs, Minnesota ++DEPARTMENT:++ Community corrections and rehabilitation ++THE POSITION++ The Department of Community Corrections and Rehabilitation (DOCCR) is seeking a Case Management Assistant to work within the Adult Probation Services Division (APSS). This position will […]]]>

++OPENING DATE :++ 03/01/22

++CLOSING DATE:++ 01/10/22 23:59 PM central time

++TYPE OF EMPLOYMENT:++ Full time

++SITE:++ Minneapolis and surrounding suburbs, Minnesota

++DEPARTMENT:++ Community corrections and rehabilitation

++THE POSITION++

The Department of Community Corrections and Rehabilitation (DOCCR) is seeking a Case Management Assistant to work within the Adult Probation Services Division (APSS). This position will look after very low risk clients and help them meet court-ordered conditions.

New employees who are hired in remote or hybrid positions between January 2, 2022 and December 31, 2024, will receive $ 500 towards the cost of establishing consistent Internet connectivity, payable at the end of 6 months of employment.

Place and times:
This position is hybrid and will be performed both on-site at the Probation Center North at 4336 Lyndale Avenue North, Minneapolis, 55412 and remotely depending on the duties of the position. Hours of work will be Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
About this position:
This position is full time, paid. As of September 1, 2021, all new job postings are conditional on the candidate being fully vaccinated against COVID-19. “Fully vaccinated” means 14 days after receiving the second dose in a series of two-dose vaccinations approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on a full or emergency use basis, or 14 days after receiving an FDA approved single dose vaccine on a full or emergency use basis. After a conditional job offer, the candidate must show full proof of vaccination before their start date. A COVID-19 vaccination card from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an vaccination card from your doctor’s office, or a personal digital vaccination card is sufficient “proof”. The candidate must also certify that he is vaccinated by filling out a form on the first day of employment. Reasonable accommodations to this vaccination requirement will be considered upon request by an applicant for medical or religious reasons, as required by applicable law.
In this position, you will have to:

  • Meet with clients to determine their needs, make referrals, and provide data to community agencies that offer interventions and resources to address the behavior.
  • Meet with clients to obtain information on the state of work, family, crime and / or health and communicate this information to judges and / or probation officers and refer them to community / treatment resources if necessary.
  • Monitor clients ‘progress on a limited basis by following treatment plans, obtaining stable employment or completing probation conditions and keeping notes on clients’ participation in programs and their progress.
  • Complete reports for court and probation officers.
  • Talk to judges, health care providers, prosecutors, probation officers and / or social workers about how to meet the needs of clients.
  • Arrange court appearances for the client and families, transporting people as needed.
  • Provide resources related to personal adjustment and life stability planning needs and compliance with probation and supervised release conditions.

Need to have:

  • One of the following:
    • Two or more years of paid social service or criminal justice experience providing direct service to clients.
    • A two-year personal service certificate.
    • Two or more years of college coursework in the behavioral sciences.
  • A valid driver’s license and the possibility of obtaining a ++ Hennepin County Driver’s License ++.

Good to have:

  • Experience:
    • Establish new partnerships with community partners to ensure clients’ access to resources.
    • Using the Offender Management System (OMS), Court Services Tracking System (CSTS) and other criminal justice databases, as well as Microsoft Office programs including Word, Excel and Outlook at an intermediate level.
    • Working with evidence-based practices
    • Work with clients or clients from various backgrounds.
  • Knowledge of community resources and social services available to serve clients; interview techniques with clients.
  • Ability to:
    • Accurately record information in an objective, clear and concise manner.
    • Establish and maintain relationships with staff, community resource providers and other criminal justice professionals so that teamwork and collaboration are preserved.
    • Build strong relationships with clients, colleagues and the public.
    • Communicate effectively orally and in writing.

About the department:The Department of Community Corrections and Rehabilitation works to improve community safety, promote community restoration, and reduce the risk of reoffending. Department staff and volunteers serve Hennepin County in more than 20 service locations ranging from correctional facilities to probation report offices and vocational training centers, providing long-lasting corrections to over 26,000 adult and underage clients. . It is the largest community corrections organization in Minnesota. Learn more at ++ www.hennepin.us / fixes ++.
About Hennepin County:
Hennepin is the largest county government organization in Minnesota. Our employees work every day to improve the health, safety and quality of life of our residents and communities. All of our jobs align with one or more of our overarching goals – that the residents of Hennepin County are healthy, protected and secure, self-reliant, due process and mobile.

Our employees receive a combination of generous benefits and a positive corporate culture not found in other organizations. This includes meaningful work that impacts our community, competitive pay, work-life balance, a variety of benefits, and opportunities for growth. Learn more at ++ www.hennepin.us / employees ++.

Hennepin County envisions an organization where our commitment to diversity and reducing disparities is fundamental to providing excellent service to our community.

Your future. Made here.

This position will be used to fill current and future vacant full-time, part-time, permanent and time-limited Case Management Assistant positions.

This position is classified internally as a Case Management Assistant. Click ++ here ++ to view the job classification specification.

Interview invitations will be based on an assessment of education and experience. The job offer will be subject to the successful completion of a pre-employment physical examination, drug test, employment background / reference check, background check, pre-employment fingerprint and driver’s license verification.


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Arizona “2021 Review” by Governor Ducey https://criminaljustice-online.com/arizona-2021-review-by-governor-ducey/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 19:16:27 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/arizona-2021-review-by-governor-ducey/ Presented by Beltone – A leader in audience health care. Achievement, Optimism and Strength: 2021 has been a year of smart policies and lasting achievements. Under Governor Doug Ducey, the past year has proven Arizona to be unstoppable. Families and businesses will be able to keep more of their hard-earned money thanks to the largest […]]]>
Presented by Beltone – A leader in audience health care.

Achievement, Optimism and Strength: 2021 has been a year of smart policies and lasting achievements.

Under Governor Doug Ducey, the past year has proven Arizona to be unstoppable. Families and businesses will be able to keep more of their hard-earned money thanks to the largest tax cut in state history. Health officials have worked diligently to get any Arizona that wants it vaccinated. Much needed resources have been devoted to securing our border and supporting law enforcement heroes. Creative approaches to fighting forest fires and providing health care have been adopted. Businesses large and small have settled and grown in the state, driven by Arizona’s land of opportunity.

Arizona has not lost sight in 2021. During a year of extraordinary challenges, the Arizonans have kept their bearings and found strength in our fellow citizens. And that’s, in the end, why the past year has been such a success.

SMART POLICIES

ECONOMIC DYNAMICS: Throughout 2021, Arizona continued to create an environment that fosters business growth and opportunity statewide. In July, Arizona passed a landmark tax reform that made Arizona the state with the lowest lump sum tax in the country. The largest tax cut in state history also protected small businesses from a 77.7% tax hike. The 2.5% flat tax saves every Arizona taxpayer money, regardless of income.

Arizona’s tax approach, combined with a responsible, non-government approach, has spurred unprecedented economic growth. This year Arizona has seen a wave of job announcements and economic growth. ElectraMeccanica innovated for its first Electric vehicle assembly facility based in the United States which will create 500 jobs. KORE Power has announced that it will bring 3,000 jobs to Buckeye for its lithium-ion battery manufacturing plant. Arizona luxury electric vehicle maker Lucid Motors has opened its state-of-the-art manufacturing facility at Casa Grande, which will generate $ 32 billion in revenue and creation of 5,000 jobs. Intel has inaugurated two new semiconductor manufacturing facilities, a $ 20 billion investment that will create 3,000 new high-tech, high-paying jobs.

Arizona also opened new economies in 2021. Gov. Ducey signed a landmark Tribal Gaming Pact Amendment to modernize gaming in Arizona, marking a multi-year effort. The expanding industry provides millions of dollars in revenue for critical government needs. Officially launched in September, the game employs thousands of Arizonans and generates millions in tax revenue that benefits areas such as Kindergarten to Grade 12 education, conservation and treatment centers.

By further removing red tape and unnecessary hurdles for business, Gov. Ducey signed bipartisan legislation in May to allow Arizona residents to order take-out cocktails. The bipartisan bill followed the positive impact of take-out alcohol sales on businesses across the state during the pandemic.

NATIONAL TELEHEALTH PROJECT: Arizona has dramatically expanded telehealth, providing greater opportunities for accessible medical services. The country’s broadest telemedicine law, House Bill 2454, expanded access to telemedicine for patients, ensured that doctors received equal compensation from insurance companies for telemedicine services, and allowed out-of-state medical professionals to provide telemedicine in Arizona.

BORDER SECURITY: Arizona continued to prioritize public safety this year as border crossings rapidly increased. In April, Governor Ducey issued an emergency declaration and deployed the Arizona National Guard to the southern border to support local law enforcement efforts as the country saw an increase in arrests and migrant children. in federal custody. The National Guard’s border security mission was extended in August for another year.

On June 30, the Arizona legislature was passed and Governor Ducey signed the fiscal year 2022 budget, which included $ 25 million in government funding for the National Guard’s border mission and $ 30 million for assist law enforcement in conducting border security operations, in addition to existing border funding. Strike force.

In July, Governor Ducey successfully pressured the Biden administration to continue Title 42 border protections and called on Congress to protect Title 42 from future interference by Biden. In December, following calls to the Biden administration for a plan to resolve the border crisis and increase federal aid, Arizona took action, increasing and repositioning public safety resources. in the Yuma sector of the southern border.

Brigadier General Kerry L. Muehlenbeck, who Governor Ducey appointed in April Arizona adjutant general and director of the Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs, heads the state’s public safety assets. General Muehlenbeck is the first woman to hold this post.

DISTRIBUTION OF VACCINES: Arizona has also prioritized public health and safety, expanding access to COVID-19 vaccines and testing, especially for underserved communities. The state has administered 10.3 million doses to date, with 4.11 million Arizonas fully vaccinated.

Former Arizona Department of Health Services Director Dr Cara Christ, who stepped down in August for another leadership role for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, was instrumental in the response from state to COVID-19. As the longest-serving director of ADHS, Dr Christ has implemented effective statewide testing and internationally recognized mass vaccination sites.

The success of Arizona’s mass vaccination sites has been identified as a national model. In March, Arizona administered the 500,000th dose of COVID-19 vaccination at State Farm Stadium, reaching 2.5 million doses statewide. The state’s vaccine response received an “A” grade from researchers at Harvard University’s Belfer Center. The recognition included categories of vaccines per capita and the time required to vaccinate eligible people.

To further support the people of Arizona, Governor Ducey has stepped up enforcement of vaccine mandates and ensured that those employed by a local government can use sick leave earned due to exposure to the disease. COVID-19. The action was in line with the Senate Bill 1824, which was signed by the governor in June.

WILD FIRE PROTECTION: Arizona has taken its proactive approach to helping small businesses and communities on the front lines of wildfires. Governor Ducey and the state legislature held a special session in June to invest $ 100 million to ensure communities in Arizona have the resources they need to deal with post-fire disasters such as flooding and reduce the risk of future forest fires. Under the legislation, the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management and the Arizona Department of Corrections, Rehabilitation and Reintegration have teamed up to remove fire-prone vegetation. Additional funds have been allocated for fire suppression efforts, recovery efforts including post-fire flooding, economic assistance to internally displaced persons, and assistance to landowners with emergency infrastructure repairs. damaged by forest fires.

Arizona has also taken steps to continue to help small businesses recover from the economic consequences of extreme weather and the pandemic. Governor Ducey launched the first round of the Small Business Rehire and Work Retention Program to support local small businesses in August and opened a second round of funding in September.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY: Looking to the future, Arizona has taken steps to open up new opportunities and create additional choices in education. In May, Governor Ducey signed a law allowing community colleges to offer four-year degrees, expanding opportunities for populations historically under-represented in higher education.

Continuing the state’s civic education, Governor Ducey signed a law in July to strengthen education about the Holocaust and other genocides in Arizona schools. The law requires Arizona’s youth to learn the lasting lessons of the Holocaust and the tragic consequences of religious and racial intolerance. House Bill 2241 requires all students in Arizona to receive education about the Holocaust and other genocides during their K-12 education at least twice between seventh and twelfth grades.

ELECTORAL INTEGRITY: Building on the state’s leadership in electoral integrity, Arizona has streamlined the way elections are conducted. Continuing to improve and refine electoral laws, the permanent early voting list has been renamed to the active early voting list (AEVL). With the AEVL, voters who actively vote by mail will continue to receive an early ballot. If a vote does not return at least one advance ballot in the four years, the voter will be notified and asked if they still wish to receive an advance ballot. Whether a voter chooses to stay on the EVL or not, they remain eligible to request an early poll or vote in person, ensuring that no voter is ever deprived of their right to vote.

Catch up with more local news on Signals A Z.com.


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Eagle County man gets four years in prison for sexual assault https://criminaljustice-online.com/eagle-county-man-gets-four-years-in-prison-for-sexual-assault/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 22:07:15 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/eagle-county-man-gets-four-years-in-prison-for-sexual-assault/ Georges brownEagle County Sheriff’s Office Editor’s Note: This article contains brief descriptions of sexual assault and illegal sexual touching that may disturb some readers. An Eagle County resident convicted of sexual assault was sentenced to four years in community prison with a mandatory parole period of 10 years in life in an emotional hearing Monday […]]]>

Georges brown
Eagle County Sheriff’s Office

Editor’s Note: This article contains brief descriptions of sexual assault and illegal sexual touching that may disturb some readers.

An Eagle County resident convicted of sexual assault was sentenced to four years in community prison with a mandatory parole period of 10 years in life in an emotional hearing Monday afternoon.

In July, a jury found George Brown guilty of six counts relating to sexual assault charges against him in 2019. Brown was convicted of sexual assault, a Class 4 felony; attempted sexual assault and unlawful sexual contact – two counts for the two women Brown assaulted while intoxicated in February 2019. He was found not guilty of a trespass charge for misdemeanor.



According to a police affidavit, Brown was one of seven people living in a house in EagleVail when he entered a woman’s separate bedroom while she and a visiting friend were intoxicated and were asleep – then got into bed and sexually assaulted both women during the night.

“He killed me that day. Maybe not literally, but mentally and emotionally he did, ”one of the women said at Monday’s hearing. “I’m not the same person who slept in that bed; I’m broken.”



Monday’s sentencing hearing represented the culmination of a nearly three-year court battle strewn with delays and an alleged violation of Brown’s rights to a speedy trial that went to the Supreme Court from Colorado earlier this year.

The delays resulted in 220 days in prison for Brown and immeasurable emotional distress for the two women he attacked, according to statements made during Monday’s hearing.

“After deciding to file a complaint, I had no idea how much time, energy, effort, confusion, anxiety, anger and frustration I would feel,” one woman said. . “I had to balance healing and participating in this legal process that I had absolutely no idea about.

“I was almost at a breaking point before we could finally go to court.”

Assistant District Attorney Johnny Lombardi argued that Brown should be sentenced to the Colorado Department of Corrections because he was on probation for a DUI case when he committed the sexual assault that night, and, shortly thereafter , he was arrested in another case in Aspen.

Reports from Brown’s pre-sentence investigation show that “he appeared to downplay the negative aspects of his behavior” and showed “a very high level of generalized defense,” Lombardi said.

“He also showed no remorse for what he did to us, and for that I won’t forgive him,” one of the women said at Brown’s hearing on Monday. “He deserves to have it follow him for the rest of his life and haunt him, just like it haunts me.”

Lombardi cited Colorado’s Sentencing Act, which states that sentencing decisions must “punish a convicted offender … based on the seriousness of his offense” and provide “an effective deterrent to offenders. other persons likely to commit similar offenses ”.

“Everyone should feel safe,” Lombardi said. He asked Justice Reed W. Owens to hand down a six-year life sentence in the Corrections Department.

Denver-based defense attorney Jonathan S. Willett accused Lombardi of choosing elements of the investigation into Brown’s presentation that suited his argument for a harsher sentence.

Willett urged Owens to make “the courageous decision” to allow Brown to rehabilitate in the community, especially after having already spent “over six months in prison.”

Willett referred to another paragraph in Colorado sentencing law that states that judges must also consider “characteristics of the individual offender” when handing down a sentence.

The back of the courtroom was filled with friends, family and Brown’s mentors on Monday, a few of whom came to the front to talk about the characteristics of the offender they know as George “Geo” Brown.

“We are providing this information to the court so you can find out who this defendant is before you today for sentencing – what the other 99% of his life has been,” said Willett.

Brown’s childhood friend, Andraes Apostol, described him as a kind and caring man who supported him through all of life’s most important moments before he was consumed with addiction.

“In recent years following the pandemic, I have seen (Brown) change my life,” said Apostol. “He was rebuilding his foundation and becoming more and more like the (Brown) I know.”

Robert Shearon, another childhood friend and sobriety mentor, said the 2019 incident was the result of “alcohol-related behavior,” adding that Brown is currently involved in several anti-alcohol programs. addiction and is showing clear signs of being on the road to recovery.

Finally, Brown stood up to speak.

“First of all, I would like to apologize (to the victims in this case). I know it has affected their daily life for the past three years. I know it has affected their family and loved ones, ”Brown said. “I am a different person today than I was in 2019.”

Brown admitted to being an alcoholic and detailed his progress in programs inside and outside of the Eagle County Jail, where he said he is currently supervising other inmates as part of an Alcoholics Anonymous program.

After listening to statements from all concerned, Owens said the sentencing decision comes down to one thing: balancing punishment with rehabilitation and imprisonment with treatment.

Brown got a low to moderate score on his psycho-sexual assessment, meaning he is “accessible to treatment,” Owens said. He also scored low on three other tests used to assess the likelihood of recidivism.

Owens praised Brown on his frankness in admitting his alcoholism and cited his strong community support system and participation in self-improvement programs in recent years as “mitigating factors” or indicators of a lighter sentence.

However, the judge pointed out that Brown was less outspoken in admitting the sexual violence he committed against the two women, whose lives will never be the same again because of it.

“Throughout this case, there has been an understatement of the role you played in the sex offense – not in the use of alcohol, not in sobriety and your recovery,” Owens said.

Owens sentenced Brown to four years in a community correctional facility rather than sending him to the Department of Corrections, where rehabilitation programs are less available.

After serving his sentence in community corrections, Brown will be placed on “intensive sex offender supervision” for 10 years in life, requiring him to register as a sex offender.

Brown was also sentenced to 90 days in prison for violating his probation conditions when he committed the 2019 bombings. His sentence will be credited for the time he has already served in prison.

Resources

If you or someone you know has been sexually assaulted, Bright Future Foundation offers comprehensive support and advocacy. Their 24/7 hotline can be reached at 970-949-7086.


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Hochul grants 10 clemency – Queens Daily Eagle https://criminaljustice-online.com/hochul-grants-10-clemency-queens-daily-eagle/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 22:31:30 +0000 https://criminaljustice-online.com/hochul-grants-10-clemency-queens-daily-eagle/ By Jacob Kaye Governor Kathy Hochul granted clemency to 10 New Yorkers on Christmas Eve, marking the first time she has used the power bestowed only on the state’s top leader since taking office in August. Pardons can take the form of pardons, granted to people who have already served their prison sentence, or commutations, […]]]>

By Jacob Kaye

Governor Kathy Hochul granted clemency to 10 New Yorkers on Christmas Eve, marking the first time she has used the power bestowed only on the state’s top leader since taking office in August.

Pardons can take the form of pardons, granted to people who have already served their prison sentence, or commutations, granted to people who are currently serving a prison sentence. Of the 10 pardons granted, nine were granted to New York immigrants with criminal records that threatened their ability to stay in the United States

Ana Sanchez Ventura, Juan Vinas, Faustino Reyes, Sandra Williams, Francisco Vargas, Orlando Fernandez Taveras, Hanley Gomez, Juan Suazo and Edilberta Reyes Canales were all pardoned by Hochul on December 24.

In Reyes Canales’s case, pardon will likely go a long way in helping him avoid deportation, governor says – Reyes Canales faces an upcoming deportation hearing.

Hochul also commuted the sentence of Roger Cole, a 55-year-old man who was serving a sentence of 85 to 100 years. Cole, who earned his GED, an associate’s degree and several certifications, has been in prison for more than three decades.

“As governor, I have a unique and solemn responsibility to carefully use the power of pardon to address those in the criminal justice system who have made mistakes and taken extraordinary measures to rehabilitate themselves,” said Hochul said in a statement. “I grant mercy to those deserving people who have exemplified rehabilitation, and I pledge to increase transparency and accountability in this process going forward. No one should be defined by their worst mistake, and these people have worked tirelessly to atone for theirs. ”

Advocates for criminal justice reform have called on Hochul – as they did on former Governor Andrew Cuomo – to do more with regard to his pardon powers. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to ravage prisons and prisons statewide, advocates say the release of incarcerated people, especially those who are older, is a matter of life and death.

Beyond the current danger presented by the virus, Reformers have embarked on a multi-year campaign to commute the sentences of older prisoners and give them the opportunity to take their cases to a reformed parole board.

Jose Saldana, the director of the campaign for the release of the elderly in prison, said he was disappointed that Hochul had used his switching powers to end the sentence of a single New Yorker.

“Today Governor Hochul has radically let down the black and Latin communities by granting clemency only to an incarcerated New Yorker,” said Saldana. “As we welcome this person into our home and celebrate for their loved ones, and as we also recognize the saving value of pardons given to those long released, we are heartbroken to know that so many of our mothers, fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers are suffering behind bars and facing a slow death sentence.

“Hochul has not granted any clemency to an incarcerated woman, and her minimal action means that thousands of elderly people continue to languish needlessly behind bars,” he added. “Instead of talking about what she will do, we call on her to take real action now and move forward in granting much more leniency to New Yorkers who are incarcerated frequently, in an inclusive and transparent manner.”

The struggle to get the governor to use more of his clemency powers predates Hochul. Cuomo did not grant leniency during his first four years in office. By the time he left office, he had granted clemency to 41 New Yorkers after receiving at least 16,000 clemency requests, according to the RAPP. Five of those graces came in his last days in office.

Steve Zeidman, a lawyer and professor at CUNY School of Law, told the Eagle in August that commutations and pardons are often granted during the holidays. Clemence’s association with the holiday season is something he sees as arbitrary and unnecessary.

“It’s supposed to be that act of clemency compatible with the holidays and the New Year, but it seems to me that someone who deserves clemency on December 24, he surely earned it on November 24, October 3, June 5, choose your date, ”Zeidman said.

Hochul’s clemency also comes after a week-long social media campaign in which social media users shared photos of themselves asking the governor to “bring them home.”

Hochul responded last week by promising to institute a series of reforms to make pardons more common.

The governor said she would devote additional human resources to reviewing applications, a process which she hopes will lead to the granting of pardons on an ongoing basis.

Additionally, Hochul said that in order to “improve transparency in the leniency application and review process,” his office will publish the number of leniency applications that have been filed over the past year, how many were granted and how many were refused, each time it grants a request.

She is also committed to communicating with applicants whose files are open and under review and providing them with updates and information on how to submit additional information for their application.

Finally, Hochul said his office would work with the Executive Leniency Office, an organ of the state’s Department of Prisons and Community Oversight, to “provide better guidance to leniency applicants on the information they should include in their requests and how they should apply to the governor’s office aware of changes in their circumstances that could affect their case.


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